Martin3 During a Filipino community and Harvard University students gathering, Speaker Ferdinand Martin G. Romualdez says the introduction of a Tagalog course in Harvard University is a source of great national pride The Speaker also delivered a policy speech at the Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government Thursday morning which was moderated by Eric Rosenbach, Co-Director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Photo by RYAN PONCE PACPACO

SFMR: Tagalog course in Harvard source of PH pride

April 20, 2023 Ryan Ponce Pacpaco 281 views

SPEAKER Ferdinand Martin G. Romualdez on Thursday said the introduction of a Tagalog course in Harvard University’s academic
offerings is a source of great national pride.

Speaker Romualdez expressed his support to the premier university’s Filipino language program.

“Our language is our pride! And learning about Harvard’s new Tagalog language course, I am expressing my full support for the program. I hope and pray that the Harvard Tagalog course will flourish and grow in the future to include many aspects of Filipino culture!” Speaker Romualdez told Harvard University students during a Filipino community gathering in Massachusetts.

The Speaker delivered a policy speech at the Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government Thursday morning before university officials, faculty members and students in Boston, Massachusetts about the future of the Philippines and United States alliance moderated by Mr. Eric Rosenbach, Co-Director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

“The teaching of Tagalog at Harvard University is a source of great national pride. The university is one of the top academic institutions in the world, if not the best. Its programs are emulated or duplicated in other institutions of higher learning. Kaya naman proud na proud tayo sa development na ito,” Speaker Romualdez declared.

Harvard University, an illustrious academic institution that has produced eight US presidents and countless great leaders, has recently decided to include Tagalog in its course offerings, along with Bahasa Indonesia and Thai, according to the student paper Harvard Crimson.

Tagalog is the dialect on which the Filipino language is mostly based.

It is reportedly the fourth most spoken language in the US, which is home to some 4.2 million Filipino Americans.

“We express our gratitude to Harvard University for recognizing the need to teach the Filipino language to those interested to learn about our rich and diverse culture. Once again, our country is in the spotlight of the world stage, and I have never been so proud to be a Filipino,” Speaker Romualdez said.

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